Sayre last name popularity, history, and meaning

Find out how popular the last name Sayre is in the United States and learn more about the meaning, history, and race and ethnic origin of people in America who are named Sayre.

Meaning of Sayre

A locational surname derived from various places in England and France, likely referring to a sayer or woodcutter.

Sayre, like all of the last names we have data for, is identified by the U.S. Census Bureau as a surname which has more than 100 occurrences in the United States in the Decennial Census survey. The most recent statistics we have for the Sayre surname is from the 2010 census data.

Popularity of Sayre in America

Sayre is the 4449th most popular name in America based on the data we have collected from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The Sayre surname appeared 7,973 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 3 people would have the surname Sayre.

We can also compare 2010 data for Sayre to data from the previous census in 2000. The table below contains all of the statistics for both years in a side-by-side comparison.

2010 2000 Change (%)
Rank 4449 4008 10.43%
Count 7,973 8,133 -1.99%
Proportion per 100k 2.70 3.01 -10.86%

The history of the last name Sayre

The surname SAYRE has its origins in the Middle English word "saye" or "saie", which referred to a type of cloth or serge fabric. This surname emerged during the late medieval period in England, where it was an occupational name given to those who wove or traded in this particular textile.

In the 13th and 14th centuries, the name was commonly spelled as "Sayer" or "Sayer" in various historical records and documents. One of the earliest recorded instances of this surname can be found in the Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire from 1273, which mentions a person named William le Sayer.

The surname SAYRE has been present in various regions of England, including Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, and Oxfordshire. It is believed that some individuals with this surname may have also been associated with the town of Sayers in Norfolk, which could have contributed to the development of the name.

One notable historical figure with this surname was Robert Sayre, who lived during the late 16th and early 17th centuries. He was an English merchant and explorer, renowned for his voyages to the West Indies and his accounts of the indigenous peoples and natural resources of the Caribbean region.

Another prominent individual was Thomas Sayre, a Puritan settler who arrived in New England in the 1630s. He was one of the founders of the town of Southampton on Long Island, New York, and played a significant role in the early colonial history of the region.

In the 18th century, David Sayre, an American botanist and horticulturist, made important contributions to the study and cultivation of plants. He was born in 1732 and is credited with introducing several plant species to the United States.

During the American Revolutionary War, Stephen Sayre served as a captain in the Continental Army. He fought in several major battles, including the Battle of Monmouth in 1778, and his military service is well-documented in historical records.

In the realm of literature, Mary Sayre, an American author and poet, gained recognition in the late 19th century for her works, including "The Knave of Hearts" and "Ye Gardeyne Boke". She was born in 1837 and her writings often explored themes of nature and love.

Race and ethnic origin of people with the last name Sayre

We also have some data on the ancestry of people with the surname Sayre.

The below race categories are the modified race categories used in the Census Bureau's population estimates program. All people were categorized into six mutually exclusive racial and Hispanic origin groups:

  1. White only
  2. Black only
  3. American Indian and Alaskan Native only
  4. Asian and Pacific Islander only
  5. Hispanic
  6. Two or More Races

For the most recent 2010 census data, the race/ethnic origin breakdown for Sayre was:

Race/Ethnicity Percentage Total Occurrences
Non-Hispanic White Only 94.31% 7,519
Non-Hispanic Black Only 0.54% 43
Non-Hispanic Asian and Pacific Islander Only 0.69% 55
Non-Hispanic American Indian and Alaskan Native 0.34% 27
Non-Hispanic of Two or More Races 1.19% 95
Hispanic Origin 2.93% 234

Note: Any fields showing (S) means the data was suppressed for privacy so that the data does not in any way identify any specific individuals.

Since we have data from the previous census in 2000, we can also compare the values to see how the popularity of Sayre has changed in the 10 years between the two census surveys.

2010 2000 Change (%)
White 94.31% 95.45% -1.20%
Black 0.54% 0.55% -1.83%
Asian and Pacific Islander 0.69% 0.84% -19.61%
American Indian and Alaskan Native 0.34% 0.26% 26.67%
Two or More Races 1.19% 0.97% 20.37%
Hispanic 2.93% 1.93% 41.15%

Data source

The last name data and ethnic breakdown of last names is sourced directly from the Decennial Census survey, conducted every 10 years by the United States Census Bureau.

The history and meaning of the name Sayre was researched and written by our team of onomatology and genealogy experts.

If you have a correction or suggestion to improve the history of Sayre, please contact us.

Reference this page

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If you found the data or information on this page useful in your research, please use the tool below to properly cite or reference Name Census as the source. We appreciate your support!

"Sayre last name popularity, history, and meaning". NameCensus.com. Accessed on July 13, 2024. http://namecensus.com/last-names/sayre-surname-popularity/.

"Sayre last name popularity, history, and meaning". NameCensus.com, http://namecensus.com/last-names/sayre-surname-popularity/. Accessed 13 July, 2024

Sayre last name popularity, history, and meaning. NameCensus.com. Retrieved from http://namecensus.com/last-names/sayre-surname-popularity/.

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